Beast

Beast

UNTitled Theatre presents

Beast

Written by Elena Bolster | Directed by Natasha Pryce | Designed by Alistair Turner

“Smile and dance and move the moving hands of yours that know to search my softer deeper spots.  You skilfully begin to join the dots.”

Inspired by the love affair between painter Egon Schiele and his muse Wally, Beast is a moving love story of two people who find themselves at sea, caught unexpectedly in the potent rise and fall of love.  Bound together inexplicably, Egon and Valie are happy to exist only for each other. But, Egon is ill, and when disease and decay set in, their story plunges into murky water. He finds himself failing Valie quickly, losing the ability to paint or to love. Drunk and reeling against the backdrop of a swirling sea, their story reaches its heartbreaking conclusion.

Beast is currently being booked for a tour regionally around the UK.  Dates and venues to be confirmed soon.  Beast was last performed in 2012 as part of a 3 week run at London’s White Bear Theatre in association with the Irish Art’s Festival where it received rave reviews before being selected for the SWFEST outdoor arts festival and performed as part of the Cultural Olympiad on the evening of the opening ceremony.

Critically acclaimed at the Edinburgh Fringe 2009, Beast was the recipient of the Judges Special Award at the Unfringed Festival in Limerick (2010). Elena Bolster’s Beast has also been staged in Smock Alley, Dublin, Theatre 503 and the Courtyard Theatre, London. Elena’s other works include Freesia, (BAC, 2010) and Skein, which was work-shopped with the Abbey Theatre as part of their New Playwrights’ Programme.

“An emotionally engaging and profoundly moving piece of theatre.”  WHAT’S ON STAGE

“It is simply beautiful.”  ONE STOP ARTS

“This show is more than just two stunning performances… It is a convergence of excellence, throughout the creative team.”  THE PUBLIC REVIEW

“Vulnerable and beautiful… I was utterly captivated by Beast”  OBSERVER

“Moving and beautifully haunting.”  BRITISH THEATRE GUIDE

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